07 February 2012

Ten Reflections


I
Become a conscious, sovereign human being, awakened to the intuitive wisdom of Self, witness to the reality and unreality of this eternal mystery of time and space.

II
Respect this diverse garden world and the inherent rights of all creatures great to small.  They are all masks of the same creation.  There is no other.

III
Treat others at least as well as you would prefer they treat you.  Do not expect them to return the favor, or to learn from your example.  No one will ever be you.

IV
Live and let live; live and let die; grasp and release; give and take; win and lose; forgive and forget; inhale and exhale; fly and land; swim and drift; rise and fall; open and close; lock and unlock; come and go; start and stop; begin and end; flow and resist; tense and relax; be and allow; create, preserve, destroy.

V
Moderation in all things.  Gluttony, greed, sloth, envy, wrath, lust, and pride are the roots of limitation, the source of suffering.  Take delight in simplicity.

VI
Share what you have to share.  But not in such a manner that it is degrading or disempowering to those you serve.  Giving to get is not sharing.

VII
Play win-win whenever practical.  Unmitigated competition is ultimately a dysfunctional paradigm.  Avoid unnecessary conflict.  No one really wins a fight.  There are plenty of cooperative opportunities for those seeking the inherent ground.

VIII
Bring children into this world only if you intend to truly care for them.  There are far too many human beings already.  Life is arduous enough without a harsh, imbalanced beginning.

IX
Do not put false wealth above real relationship.  Learn to listen to the many voices of nature.  Learn to see with its many eyes.  Mountains of gold do not compare with a child's joy in a mound of sand, a bird's in the morning sun, or a dolphin's in the passing wave.

X
Creation, preservation, and destruction are equal partners in this vast kaleidoscoping lightshow, in the infinite aloneness of this dreamtime theater.  Deeply understanding this may lessen the suffering of your brief existence.  Try not to take it all so seriously that you cannot laugh, at least occasionally, at this temporary identity, this brief ever-changing, three-dimensional illusion to which you are so attached.